Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Documentation

Overview of the Health Checks Service

The Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Health Checks service provides users with high frequency external monitoring to determine the availability and performance of any publicly facing service, including hosted websites, API endpoints, or externally facing load balancers. By using Health Checks, users can ensure that they are immediately aware of any availability issue affecting their customers.

Health Checks Service Components

The following list describes the key components used in creating a health check.

monitors
Monitors allow you to continuously monitor the health of public-facing endpoints. You can configure monitors to use either HTTP and ping protocols.
on-demand probes
On-demand probes allow you to execute a one-time probe to assess the health of a public-facing endpoint. You can configure on-demand probes to use either or both HTTP and ping protocols. This feature is currently only available via the REST API.
vantage points
Vantage points are geographic locations from which monitors and probes can be executed to your specified target. Oracle Cloud Infrastructure maintains dozens of vantage points around the world.
protocols
The Health Checks service allows you to configure both HTTP and ping type monitors. Each type has respective protocols.

Ways to Access the Health Checks Service

You can access Oracle Cloud Infrastructure using the Console (a browser-based interface) or the REST API. Instructions for the Console and API are included in topics throughout this guide.

To access the Console, you must use a supported browser. You can use the Console link at the top of this page to go to the sign-in page. Enter your tenancy, user name, and your password.

Authentication and Authorization

Each service in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure integrates with IAM for authentication and authorization, for all interfaces (the Console, SDK or CLI, and REST API).

An administrator in your organization needs to set up A collection of users who all need a particular type of access to a set of resources or compartment., A collection of related resources that can be accessed only by certain groups that have been given permission by an administrator in your organization., and An IAM document that specifies who has what type of access to your resources. It is used in different ways: to mean an individual statement written in the policy language; to mean a collection of statements in a single, named "policy" document (which has an Oracle Cloud ID (OCID) assigned to it); and to mean the overall body of policies your organization uses to control access to resources. that control which users can access which services, which resources, and the type of access. For example, the policies control who can create new users, create and manage the cloud network, launch instances, create buckets, download objects, etc. For more information, see Getting Started with Policies. For specific details about writing policies for each of the different services, see Policy Reference.

If you’re a regular user (not an administrator) who needs to use the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure resources that your company owns, contact your administrator to set up a user ID for you. The administrator can confirm which compartment or compartments you should be using.

Health Checks Service Capabilities and Limits

The Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Health Checks service is limited to 1000 endpoint tests per account.

See Service Limits for a list of applicable limits and instructions for requesting a limit increase. To set compartment-specific limits on a resource or resource family, administrators can use compartment quotas.

Required IAM Service Policy

To use Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, you must be given the required type of access in a An IAM document that specifies who has what type of access to your resources. It is used in different ways: to mean an individual statement written in the policy language; to mean a collection of statements in a single, named "policy" document (which has an Oracle Cloud ID (OCID) assigned to it); and to mean the overall body of policies your organization uses to control access to resources. written by an administrator, whether you're using the Console or the REST API with an SDK, CLI, or other tool. If you try to perform an action and get a message that you don’t have permission or are unauthorized, confirm with your administrator the type of access you've been granted and which A collection of related resources that can be accessed only by certain groups that have been given permission by an administrator in your organization. you should work in.

If you're new to policies, see Getting Started with Policies and Common Policies. For more details about policies for Health Checks, see Details for the Health Checks Service.

Policy examples:

  • To enable all operations on Health Checks for all users in a tenant :
    Allow any-user to manage health-check-family in tenancy
  • To enable all operations on Health Checks for all users in a compartment:
    Allow any-user to manage health-check-family in compartment <Compartment Name>
  • To enable all operations on Health Checks for a specific user group:
    Allow group <Your Group Name> to manage health-check-family in compartment <Compartment Name>

Moving Health Checks to a Different Compartment

You can move health checks from one compartment to another. When you move a health check to a new compartment, its associated monitor and test results moves with it. After the move, health checks are accessible through the SDK, CLI, and Console. For more information, see Managing Compartments.

Tagging Resources

You can apply tags to your resources to help you organize them according to your business needs. You can apply tags at the time you create a resource, or you can update the resource later with the desired tags. For general information about applying tags, see Resource Tags.