Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Documentation

Troubleshooting Windows NFS Client Connections

This topic describes some common issues encountered when installing Windows NFS client and mounting a file system.

Important

To connect to file systems from Windows instances, the NFS Client must first be installed. Be sure to follow the installation procedure found in Mounting File Systems From Windows Instances before proceeding with troubleshooting.

Cannot Create or Write to Files on a Mounted File System

Symptom: After installing Windows NFS client, you can successfully mount the file system from Windows, but any attempt to create or update a file in the file system fails.

Cause 1: Access to NFS file systems requires UNIX-style user and group identities, which are not the same as Windows user and group identities. To enable users to access NFS shared resources, Windows client for NFS accesses file systems anonymously, using 'AnonymousGid' and 'AnonymousUid'. On brand new file systems, write permissions are only granted to the root user.

Solution: Map the AnonymousGid and AnonymousUid to the root user, and then remount the file system with the new user privileges.

To map the AnonymousGid and AnonymousUid to the root user

Cause 2: A standard user is trying to access a file system that was mounted using the Administrator: Command Prompt (CMD). When mounting file systems, it isn't necessary to run the Command Prompt as Administrator.

Solution: Unmount the file system and then remount the file system using a standard Command Prompt. (CMD)

To remount a file system with a standard Command Prompt (CMD)

Mounted Drive is Not Visible in File Explorer

Symptom: After installing Windows NFS client, you can successfully mount the file system from Windows, but the file system drive is not visible in File Explorer.

Cause: A standard user is trying to access a file system that was mounted using the Administrator: Command Prompt (CMD). When mounting file systems, it isn't necessary to run the Command Prompt as Administrator.

Solution: Unmount the file system and then remount the file system using a standard Command Prompt. (CMD) See previous information about how To remount a file system with a standard Command Prompt (CMD).

Mounting from File Explorer Fails With "An Unexpected Error Occurred."

Symptom: The IP address and export path are correctly represented in the Folder field. When you click Finish, the system attempts to connect to the file system, but fails with an error: "The mapped network drive could not be created because the following error has occurred: An unexpected error occurred."

Solution 1: Reboot the instance, and mount the file system again using File Explorer.

Solution 2: Mount the file system using the Command Prompt.

Accessing a File System Using Universal Naming Convention (UNC) Methods

You can use the following Universal Naming Convention (UNC) methods to access files in a mounted file system:

  • Open the Command Prompt by clicking Search and typing cmd. Use the start command and enter the UNC path:

    start \\10.0.0.1\export_path_name\folder_or_file_name
  • Open the Command Prompt by clicking Search and typing cmd. Use the dir command and enter the UNC path:

    dir \\10.0.0.1\export_path_name\folder_name
  • Open the Run window by clicking Search and typing run. Enter the UNC path:

    \\10.0.0.1\export_path_name\folder_or_file_name

Learn more about how Windows uses the Multiple UNC Provider.

Windows 2008 R2: UNC Access Delayed; "Network Error 53 Network path not found"

Symptom1 : After installing NFS client on Windows 2008 R2 servers, mount fails with "Network Error 53 "Network path not found".

Symptom 2: After installing NFS client, connection to a file system using a Universal Naming Convention (UNC) path, is significantly delayed on Windows 2008 R2 servers.

Cause 1: Windows Network Provider has higher priority than Client for NFS Network Provider.

Solution 1: Change the Network Provider Order so that Client for NFS Network Provider is tried first.

To change the Network Provider Order on Windows 2008 R2

Cause 2: Mounting a file system requires stateful ingress TCP ports 111, 2048, 2049, and 2050 in addition to stateful ingress UDP ports 111 and 2048. The security list rules for the subnet where the mount target resides are not correctly set up.

Solution 2: Use the instructions in Configuring VCN Security List Rules for File Storage to set up the correct security list rules.